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August 16, 2018



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Setting an example for social cohesion: Kippa Day on 19 July 2018


 

Mayor Ashok Sridharan intends to set an example for social cohesion and against growing anti-Semitism. After last week’s anti-Semitic attack on a Jewish visiting scientist, he has invited to a Kippa Day on Bonn’s Market Square in front of the Old Town Hall for Thursday, 19 July 2018, at 3 pm.

Jointly with Bonn’s citizens and the Jewish congregation and community, Mayor Sridharan wants to make it clear that anti-Semitism has no room in the city of Bonn: "Nobody in Bonn, none of our citizens, let alone one of the guests in our city, should have to be afraid of assaults here. And not even for carrying religious symbols,” said Ashok Sridharan, who condemned the attack in the strongest terms.

Apart from Mayor Sridharan, Dr. Margret Traub, Chair of the Synagogue congregation in Bonn, and Dr. Martin Frick, Senior Director for Policy and Programme Coordination at the United Nations Climate Secretariat (UNFCCC) will speak at the Kippa Day.

The event had originally been planned for November 2018. Due to the recent anti-Semitic attack on the Israeli professor, who lives in the USA, the event will take place on July 19, in coordination with the Jewish community. The Bonn Memorial Association and the Bonn Chapter of the German-Israeli Society support the Mayor’s initiative. Since Jewish men usually war a kippa, participants of the Kippa Day are asked to bring a kippa.

Background

Kippa, in plural kippot, is the Hebrew word for cap. It is a flat, circular headgear made of fabric or leather worn by Jewish men. Wearing the kippa is not a law, but a custom. Usually only male Jews war a kippa - both in worship and in everyday life. In Reform Judaism, female rabbis also wear kippa in the divine service as a sign of gender equality.


Last update: July 20, 2018




 


 

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